Archive for the ‘Plugins’ Category

IMLS funds Omeka Everywhere

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

The Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, in partnership with Ideum and the University of Connecticut’s Digital Media Center, is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a National Leadership Grant for Museums from the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences to create Omeka Everywhere. Dramatically increasing the possibilities for visitor access to collections, Omeka Everywhere will offer a simple, cost-effective solution for connecting onsite web content and in-gallery multi-sensory experiences, affordable to museums of all sizes and missions, by capitalizing on the strengths of two successful collections-based open-source software projects: Omeka and Open Exhibits.

Currently, museums are expected to engage with visitors, share content, and offer digitally-enabled experiences everywhere: in the museum, on the Web, and on social media networks. These ever-increasing expectations, from visitors to museum administrators, place a heavy burden on the individuals creating and maintaining these digital experiences. Content experts and museum technologists often become responsible for multiple systems that do not integrate with one another. Within the bounds of tight budget, it is increasingly difficult for institutions to meet visitors’ expectations and to establish a cohesive digital strategy. Omeka Everywhere will provide a solution to these difficulties by developing a set of software packages, including Collections Viewer templates, mobile and touch table applications, and the Heist application, that bring digital collections hosted in Omeka into new spaces, enabling new kinds of visitor interactions.

Omeka Everywhere will expand audiences for museum-focused publicly-funded open source software projects by demonstrating how institutions of all sizes and budgets can implement next-generation computer exhibit elements into current and new exhibition spaces. Streamlining the workflows for creating and sharing digital content with online and onsite visitors, the project will empower smaller museums to rethink what is possible to implement on a shoestring budget. By enabling multi-touch and 3D interactive technologies on the museum floor, museums will reinvigorate interest in their exhibitions by offering on-site visitors unique experiences that connect them with the heart of the institution—their collections.

New and Updated Plugins: Omeka Api Import, CSS Editor, and more!

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

New Plugins

The Omeka team is very happy to announce the release of two new plugins: Omeka API Import and CSS Editor.

Omeka Api Import allows you to import content from one Omeka site into another using Omeka’s API (the origin Omeka site must be at version 2.1 or higher to have the API). Items and files, collections, and more data can be duplicated from one site into another and updated periodically. This can be a handy solution for a simple migration to a new server, or for collecting several Omeka projects into one central Omeka site. Learn more in the documentation.

CSS Editor allows site builders who are familiar with Cascading Style Sheets to customize the display of their sites without needing to directly modify theme files. A simple configuration form lets you enter your new code to override what Omeka and the theme provide. Please read the documentation for details.

Updated Plugins

Thanks to the feedback from our users and contributors, we also have updates for three plugins with bugfixes and improvements.

Commenting now uses the same database indexing as other parts of Omeka, and allows reading gravatars over secure connections (thanks to Daniel Berthereau). It also includes better permissions handling for commenting (thanks to Daniel Lind).

Simple Pages has been updated to allow much longer pages, so you can write as much as you want (thanks to Rachel Donahue for the suggestion).

Geolocation includes a fix to make it interact better with Contribution, and there are display improvements in Simple Contact Form.

Many thanks to all of the users and developers in ever-growing Omeka community. Keep up the good work, and keep helping us improve Omeka!

New and updated plugins now available

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

The land of Omeka plugins has been very active lately, and we have several new and updated plugins for you: Exhibit Builder 3.0, Geolocation, Zotero Import, Redact Elements (new!), and Commenting.

Exhibit Builder 3.0

Omeka users know Exhibit Builder as the primary tool for creating narratives around the items in an Omeka installation. Exhibit Builder 3.0 has been in release candidate status for some time, and we’re now ready to release it officially.

Exhibit Builder 3.0 is redesigned to allow much more flexibility in the layouts you can create. Rather than choosing a layout for the entire page, Exhibit Builder 3.0 breaks the page into stacked blocks with different arrangements of images and text. This lets you recreate all of the old Exhibit Builder page layouts, but also adds flexibility to mix different arrangements on your exhibit pages.

Exhibit Builder Layouts

The new Exhibit Builder also makes it much easier for plugins to add their own layouts to the available options. the new release of Geolocation, for example, now lets you add a map to your exhibit pages. Developers will be able to easily enrich the possibilities for your exhibits, and we’d love to hear what you all build!

Read more about it in the Exhibit Builder 3.0 documentation, and developers can learn how to add layouts in the Exhibit Builder developer documentation.

The new version of Exhibit Builder is not yet packaged with Omeka core releases, so to give it a try you’ll need to download the new version and update it in your site.

Zotero Import

The much-requested Zotero Import plugin is now updated for Omeka 2.x. You can now pull items from your Zotero libraries into your Omeka 2.x installation.

Read more in the Zotero Import 2.0 documentation.

 

 

 

Redact Elements

This new plugin was born of a need to keep some content in Omeka items confidential. If you have a collection of emails, for example, you might want the full email, including email addresses, available to researchers, but not the general public. Similarly, you might want to hide URLs or IP addresses. Redact Elements lets you do so, and it lets you create new patterns for text that should be hidden. Read more about the options in the Redact Elements documentation.

Geolocation and Commenting

These two plugins have been updated with bugfixes, and Geolocation adds a layout for Exhibit Builder 3.0.

Several new and updated translations are also available for Exhibit Builder 3.0, Geolocation, and Commenting.

 

Two more updated plugins: OAI-PMH Harvester and OAI-PMH Repository

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

The Omeka team is happy to announce updates of the popular OAI-PMH Repository and OAI-PMH Harvester plugins for Omeka 2.0.

The Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting allows for metadata about objects to be shared across repositories and applications. The harvester allows you to import items into your Omeka installation using the protocol. The repository, in turn, makes metadata about your items available for other sites to collect.

The updated version of the repository also adds the METS standard to the formats available for the output, which makes files, in addition to metadata, available to harvesters.

More of Omeka in more languages!

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

The Omeka core has been localizable for some time, and the hard-working and dedicated volunteers at Transifex have made it possible for you to use Omeka in a number of languages.

Now, as we are upgrading plugins and building new ones for Omeka 2.0, we’ll start to roll out localizations for the plugins as well. Every six weeks, we will update plugins that have new translations available. This schedule will help keep your localizations as up-to-date as possible, while giving the people doing translations a regular timeline for when their work will be put into action in your sites.

 

 

The first round of translation updates contains new or updated translations for the following plugins:

We have also started the process of creating translations of the Commenting and Geolocation plugins, and more will be added soon. Watch the resources page to see what plugins are available for translation. So far, forty-two language teams have been created that you can join to contribute your translating skills, or you can always create a new team for your own language.

More new things for the Omeka family of products!

Thursday, April 25th, 2013

We’re happy to announce a maintenance release of Omeka, bringing us to version 2.0.3! This maintenance release fixes some bugs to the HTML editor, error reporting, display, and more. Please read the release notes for details.

There are also improvements to all of the bundled themes (Thanks, Roy; Seasons; Berlin). This release also includes the new “Night” stylesheet in the bundled Seasons theme.

We also have one new plugin, Derivative Images, and two updated ones, Commenting and Geolocation.

Derivative Images is an evolved version of the Image Files plugin for Omeka 2.x. Image Files for Omeka 1.x let you resize your thumbnail and other derivatives. With Omeka 2.0 now producing derivatives of many more file types (sound, document, etc.), this completely reworked plugin allows you to selectively produce new derivatives for any file type. This is especially useful for sites that have upgraded to Omeka 2.x from Omeka 1.x and want to take advantage of the new derivative images.

Geolocation includes a small but important improvement. Matti Lassila added an option for searching with a radius in kilometres instead of miles.

Commenting has been upgraded with new features and security, such as the ability to allow site visitors to flag comments as inappropriate.

Speaking of commenting, for our friends using Omeka.net as their hosted Omeka solution, Commenting is now included in Silver plans and above. (Note that Omeka.net, and the Commenting plugin, have not yet been upgraded to Omeka 2.0, though we are working on that, too.)

 

New plugins, a theme update, and exciting things ahead!

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

The Omeka team is happy to announce new and updated plugins and themes.

Geolocation is now updated to be compatible with the Omeka 2.x series. Geolocation allows you to pin a location for your items onto a map, and display a map showing all the geolocated items.

geolocation2

 

srchByMetadata

We are also happy to release a brand new plugin for Omeka, Search By Metadata. It allows site builders to build navigation between items by turning any field into an automatic search for other items with the same data. If you want to guide your visitors from one item with the subject “Digital Humanities” to a list of other items with that subject, this plugin lets you do that quickly and easy through the admin interface.

 

Finally, we are releasing an update to the Seasons theme. In the spirit of breaking expectations, there is now a fifth season — “night”. The night stylesheet is a dark style, suitable for displays of artwork.

seasons-night

 

More is on the way, and in the next two weeks we’ll spend less time talking about what we have produced and more about what our community has been up to. There are great new plugins and themes coming Omeka designers and developers out in the world. So, for a special Day of DH post we’ll draw attention to them and their work, and show our appreciation.

Fun New Things for Omeka 2.0 (Part 2): Core Changes

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

Following up on the previous post, here, we want to talk about the broad contours of changes coming in Omeka 2.0 that will be most important for theme and plugin developers.

First and most important, the codebase of Omeka is being extensively cleaned up. This should not only make the code faster and leave a smaller footprint, but also make it easier to find your way around the code to see how things work.

Broadly speaking, unnecessary or redundant functions and methods are being removed. This includes many of the wrapper methods in some of the core code used by plugins. The various functions used to access metadata about collections, items, and other kinds of content are also consolidated from collection(), item(), etc. into one function, metadata(), for all.

Some of these changes will require updating your existing themes and plugins. We are keeping a running list of changes to help you anticipate the updates you will need to make for your plugin and theme customization.
One example is that the directory named “archive” will be called “files” in 2.0. The “files” folder that currently resides in the “archive” directory will be renamed “original.” We will provide specific instructions for renaming those folders to ensure that the transition to 2.0 will go smoothly. .

As always, you can keep up to date with the most recent changes by watching Omeka on GitHub.

Many thanks to our users, theme developers, and plugin developers for your feedback and questions that led to these and many, many other improvements to Omeka in our upcoming release of Omeka 2.0.

The developer team of John Flatness, Jim Safley, and myself have worked very hard over the past months to implement these changes. We hope that you are as excited about these changes as we are, and eagerly anticipate your feedback in mid-October when the release candidate is ready.

New Plugins for a New Release

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Today, we offer a Spring bug fix release, version 1.5.1, which contains a few backend fixes (see release notes) and additional base languages contributed and translated by the Omeka community. See the current list of translations available, and if you don’t see your preferred language, sign up to start your own translation.

Coinciding with this bug-fix release, we are also making two new plugins available and updating a third. Each of these plugins work with Omeka version 1.5 and above.

  1. Library of Congress Suggest: Building on work done for the Library of Congress Subject Headings plugin, LC Suggest extends the functionality by adding an auto-complete feature to almost any metadata field in your Omeka site by pulling results from the Library of Congress’s full list of authorities and controlled vocabularies. The plugin is configurable by end users, within the admin interface.
  2. Item Order: Responding to user feedback, the Item Order plugin allows users to re-order items for public display on the public Collection browse pages from within the admin interface.
  3. Scripto: Updating this plugin fixes a small bug in the plugin libraries. Scripto gives an Omeka site crowdsourcing functionality for any item type. If you are interested in testing Scripto with Omeka, try it out in our Sandbox site.

We are happy to see the Omeka user base continue to grow. We have noticed many more members of the community are helping on the forums and teaching Omeka workshops–one person even offered to host one in her own living room! Thank you for spreading the Omeka love and for contributing back to the project.

Happy Spring!

Do you share your data?

Monday, August 29th, 2011

Since 2009, any Omeka website may make their data available by activating the OAI-PMH Repository plugin and may harvest OAI-PMH data sets with the OAI-PMH Harvester. Now, the OAI-PMH Harvester plugin is available with every Omeka.net site. Are you sharing and harvesting?

Some online repositories expose their metadata through the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (OAI-PMH), an “initiative to develop and promote interoperability standards that aim to facilitate the efficient dissemination of content.”

We here at CHNM developed Omeka with interoperability as a key feature from its early stages. We also envisioned that Omeka would facilitate the sharing of digital collections and archives across institutions and individuals. For example, a regional cultural consortium could highlight collections in an Omeka site featuring digital objects from local museums, galleries, and libraries focused on on thematic topics or for the purpose of celebrating a local anniversary or special event.

Never tried this sharing thing? All you need to do is to install the OAI-PMH Repository to expose data, and tell someone–either through our list of harvestable Omeka sites, or with the OAI community. The plugin reads an Omeka collection as a set. If you have no collections, your entire archive may be exposed.

If you’re interested in testing out the OAI-PMH Harvester plugin, try these examples of harvestable sets. (Don’t worry, you may delete the harvest when you’re done testing.):

The page of harvestable sets is small and we would like to see it grow. Sign into the wiki, add your base URL, and let the Omeka community know if you are exposing your data. Thanks for sharing!